Davis Polk, First Wave of Pay Ratio Disclosures Filed

Financials: 1:1 – 429:1

Health Care: 6.4:1 – 388:1

Industrials: 50:1 – 428:1

Real Estate: 14.84:1 – 111:1

Utilities: 55:1 – 190:1

Energy: 0.9:1 – 25:1

Information Technology: 46:1

Materials: 59.6:1

Telecommunications Services: 85:1

Statistical Sampling. No companies disclosed the use of statistical sampling for purposes of identifying their median employee.

Six US Market Regulation Predictions for 2018

 私が働いていた事務所のパートナーによる2018年の米国における市場規制に関する記事です。フィナンシャル・タイムズに掲載された模様。

(4). SEC to seek fiduciary standard for broker-dealers

The conventional wisdom is that Trump appointees will remove, rather than add, new regulatory requirements, but there are a few critical areas that belie this expectation. For example, Jay Clayton, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission, has expressed a strong commitment to tackle the fiduciary standard for brokers in 2018. The Department of Labor recently delayed until mid-2019 the implementation of key provisions of its fiduciary rule that applies to transactions with retirement account clients. The delay provides breathing room for coordination on a consistent approach by the two agencies. Look for possible complications, however, due to the arrival of two new commissioners at the SEC this year, each of whom may have very different views of the necessity and impact of moving from a suitability to a fiduciary standard for brokers.

(5). More enforcement actions related to virtual currencies

We expect the explosion of public interest in the trading of virtual currencies and virtual-currency-related products to continue. US regulators spent much of the second half of 2017 actively focused on these products and the regulatory issues they raised. The SEC, CFTC and state regulators all warned the public of the potential risks of trading in these products. While agencies brought enforcement actions in instances of clear fraud or manipulation, for the most part their efforts have been focused on clarifying the scope of their authority and the application of their regulations to these activities. We believe this approach is likely to shift very quickly and sharply as the regulators pivot to an enforcement mode. Market participants, particularly those involved in offering or selling unregistered securities or who deal in these products without the necessary licences, will be much more likely to face enforcement action than in the past.

Salman Decided

via Sheppard Mullin, Poter Wright, Sullivan & Cromwell

大統領選の結果に関するメモランダム

〔題名を変更しました〕

President-Elect Trump’s transition website promises to “dismantle the Dodd-Frank Act and replace it with new policies to encourage economic growth and job creation.” To help our clients keep up with the reorientation of the financial regulatory framework, Davis Polk is launching a new blog, FinRegReform.com. Our most recent entry on the blog is our memorandum on Rep. Jeb Hensarling’s (R-TX) Financial CHOICE Act, introduced earlier this year, which we view as a starting point that signals a potential general direction of travel for financial reform. It is not the end, however, as we expect that the Republican Congress and Administration will have more ambitious plans for changes to the regulatory framework, and complex negotiations both within the Republican Party and with Democrats will further shape the ultimate result. The first post on our blog describes, in more technical detail, how a regulatory rollback might work.

委任状合戦におけるmajority voting

Davis Polk writes:

Over 40% of the Russell 3000 companies require directors to be elected by a majority of the votes cast. However, in a contested election, most often the standard reverts back to plurality, meaning that nominees who receive the most number of votes are elected regardless of whether they obtained a majority.

Ethan Allen is among the nearly 6% of companies that do not have a plurality carve-out, according to ISS. That posed the interesting question of what happens if none of the candidates on either ballot, or in any case less candidates than the seven available seats for the board, receive a majority of the votes cast.

米国における株主提案

Davis Polk writes:

This season ISS is tracking only 10 proposals seeking to declassify boards, a two-third drop from the number of proposals in 2014. This is likely attributable to the absence of assistance from the Harvard Shareholder Rights Project. The Harvard group indicated that it has completed the declassification project that it started in 2011 and the clinic is not operating during the current academic year. Of S&P 500 companies, 75% now have annually elected boards.

Majority voting proposals also dropped, from 50 in 2014 to 10 this year. 86% of large-cap companies use majority voting standards for election of directors.

via Davis Polk Briefing: Governance